Monthly Archives: August 2012

Artacho Jurado – Unexpected gems in São Paulo architecture

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Cinderela building, 1956, lobby. Original press photo. From the archives of Diva Jurado.

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Bretagne building, 1959, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Bretagne building, 1959, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

Bretagne building, 1959, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by ESPASSO

Bretagne building, 1959, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

Bretagne building, 1959, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by ESPASSO

Bretagne building, 1959, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Bretagne building, 1959, rooftop terrace detail. Photo by Simone Iwai.

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Bretagne building, 1959, outdoor details. Photo by Simone Iwai.

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Bretagne building, 1959, hallway. Photo by Simone Iwai.

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Bretagne building, 1956, piano room, decorated to Jurado's taste. From the archives of Diva Jurado.

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Promotional still for Holiday for Lovers, 1959, filmed at the Bretagne building in São Paulo

Piauí building, 19, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by ESPASSO

Piauí building, 1949, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Piauí building, 1949, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Piauí building, 1949, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Piauí building, 1949, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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Piauí building, 1949, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

Piauí building, 19, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by ESPASSO

Piauí building, 1949, by Artacho Jurado. Photo by N.V.

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João Artacho Jurado (1907-1983) was the proprietor of construction company Monções Construturas and was responsible for the project and construction of several outlandish residential buildings in the 1940’s and 1950’s in downtown São Paulo and adjacent neighborhood Higienópolis.  With a background in sign making and advertising, and a pioneer in suburban grid planning, Jurado wasn’t a trained architect nor affiliated with any particular cultural movement. His  father was a famed anarchist who instilled in him freedom from institutions as it is said Jurado didn’t attend schools growing up.

Jurado’s architectural oddities associated disparate stylistic references and marked the condominium emergence in the S.P. capital – the Bretagne, 1959, for example, is said to be the first building in São Paulo to include a swimming pool in its common area, along with a piano room, game room and rooftop terrace bar, as well as being one of the first buildings in São Paulo to offer a wide range of apartment sizes.

Channeling a romantic eclecticism, through the post-war sentiment of economic expansion and consumerism, Jurado’s designs conflate neo-classicism, art nouveau, art deco, modernism and others styles, amounting to fantastical edifices (think Disney, or The Jetsons) that integrated collective living and social leisure through the residential site.

Though praised by some critics at the time, Jurado’s projects were snubbed by many of his Brazilian contemporaries as his signature palette of pinks, blues and yellows, gilded walls, fixtures and tiling, destabilized and integrated high and low, kitsch and high-industrialism.  Jurado’s legacy illustrates the willful and idiosyncratic nature of a practice outside an institutional discourse, as it reveals a brand of mid-century design that favors a democratic and whimsical use of materials, function and form over the often rigid methodologies of the time.

N.V.

Época Negócios – July 2012

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Carlos Motta feature on Época Negócios

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Carlos Motta feature on Época Negócios

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Carlos Motta feature on Época Negócios

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Carlos Motta feature on Época Negócios

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Feature on Carlos Motta‘s unique practice on Brazilian business trade magazine Época Negócios.

California Home + Design – July/August 2012

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ESPASSO LA/Sergio Rodrigues on California Home + Design

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ESPASSO LA/Sergio Rodrigues on California Home + Design

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London 2012 Olympics Closing Ceremony looks ahead to Rio 2016

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Dancer Renato Sorriso at the London 2012 Olympics Closing Ceremony

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Dancer Renato Sorriso and Pelé at the London 2012 Olympics Closing Ceremony

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Singer Marisa Monte at the 2012 Olympics Closing Ceremony

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Singer Marisa Monte at the 2012 London Olympics Closing Ceremony

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Dancer Renato Sorriso, model Alessandra Ambrosio and singer Seu Jorge at the London 2012 Olympics Closing Ceremony

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Rio de Janeiro Mayor Eduardo Paes, International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Jacques Rogge and London Mayor Boris Johnson

Photos: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6

An 8-minute artistic segment titled ‘Embraced’, at the 2012 London Olympics Closing Ceremony, marked the handover of the Olympic games to its next host city, Rio de Janeiro. Conceived by Cao Hamburger and Daniela Thomas, the spectacle brought together dancer Renato Sorriso, performing as a street-cleaner in a quickstep samba choreography, acclaimed singer Marisa Monte, rapper BNegão, singer Seu Jorge, model Alessandra Ambrósio and the surprise appearance by soccer legend Pelé, which brought the 80,000 people in the audience to their feet.  Prior to the show, Rio de Janeiro’s Mayor Eduardo Paes was presented  the Olympic Flag by International Olympic Committee (IOC) President Jacques Rogge and London Mayor Boris Johnson.

 

 

Brazilian artists Eder Santos e Cao Guimarães and experimental composer Arto Lindsay at Union Square Park, NY

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Blow, 2000 (film still) by Cao Guimarães and Rivane Neuenschwander

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Gambiarra # 108, 2011. Cao Guimarães

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Pilgrimage, 2011 (film still), Eder Santos.

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On Wednesday August 8th at 8 pm at Union Square Park, NYC, the Instituto de Cultura Contemporeana (ICC) from Sao Paulo, Brazil,  will showcase a program that includes videos by Brazilian artist Eder Santos and director Cao Guimarães, as well as a show by experimental musician, composer and producer Arto Lindsay.  Part of the Summer Nights series organized by Arte Institute.

 

 

Brazilian design in Max Payne 3

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Screen Grab from Max Payne 3 with version of Sergio Rodrigues' 'Cantu High' dining chair

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Screen Grab from Max Payne 3 with version of Sergio Rodrigues' 'Diz' armchair

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Screen Grab from Max Payne 3 with version of Arthur Casas' 'Quilombo' sideboard

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Set in São Paulo, the third title of video game franchise Max Payne sees its title character shooting his way in and out of the city’s urban landscape, favelas and luxury high-rises. The imaginary of Brazilian violence is exploited as backdrop for the game’s sordid storyline, as iconic buildings and neighborhoods of São Paulo are realistically depicted, while indoor settings are decorated with renditions of contemporary and modern Brazilian furniture design.  Seen in the images above are versions of Sergio RodriguesCantu dining chair and Diz armchair, and of Arthur CasasQuilombo sideboard.

 

Niemeyer in 3D

Oscar Niemeyer in 3D by Vicente Depaulo

Cathedral of Brasilia, Brasilia, 1958. Photo by Vicente de Paulo.

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Itamaraty Palace (Ministry of External Relations), Brasilia, 1962. Photo by Vicente de Paulo.

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Alvorada Palace, Brasilia, 1958. Photo by Vicente de Paulo.

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Honestino Guimarães National Museum, Brasilia, 1960. Photo by Vicente de Paulo.

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As part of Visionaire magazine’s upcoming September Rio de Janeiro issue, a limited edition portfolio will be published featuring 10 anaglyphic 3D images of some of Oscar Niemeyer’s most iconic buildings.  Produced in collaboration with art seller website Paddle 8 and photographer Vicente de Paulo, the same 10 images will also be  reproduced as pairs of slides to be viewed through a stereoscope.

 

 

Julio Bittencourt at ESPASSO NY

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Prestes Maia 22, Julio Bittencourt, 2012

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Prestes Maia 20, Julio Bittencourt, 2012

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Prestes Maia 15, Julio Bittencourt, 2012

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Prestes Maia 08, Julio Bittencourt, 2012

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On view at ESPASSO NY are new prints from Julio Bittencourt’s 3-year project In a Window of Prestes Maia 911 Buildingwhich documented residents of a squatted building in São Paulo through the windows of their apartment.  In an effective voyeuristic tableaux, conjuring Hitchcock’s Rear Window, Bittencourt’s compositions blur the line between staged portraiture and documentary photography as each unique print reconfigures the windows of the Prestes Maia building and its inhabitants.