Tag Archives: Carlos Motta

Espasso Annex is now open!

ESPASSO ANNEX-18 copy
ESPASSO ANNEX-10 copy
ESPASSO ANNEX-2 copy
ESPASSO ANNEX-21 copy
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Espasso Annex, the latest venture from Espasso founder Carlos Junqueira, is a gallery dedicated to showcasing vintage and limited edition Brazilian furniture. In addition, the Annex has forged a collaboration with Sao Paulo’s Luciana Brito Galeria – one of the leading art galleries in Brazil. As part of Luciana Brito’s New York Project, three curated exhibitions will be presented throughout the next twelve months.

Espasso Annex was created as a compliment to nearby Espasso, to meet the growing demand of its customers for vintage and rare furniture by its roster of acclaimed Brazilian designers. The new location will allow the original Espasso, and its locations in Los Angeles, Miami and London, to expand upon its exclusive collection of contemporary designers, including re-edition furniture and accessories.

Espasso Annex  
186 Franklin Street
New York, NY  10013

Monday-Saturday: By appointment only
Sunday: Closed

Phone: 212.219.0017
Fax: 212.219.0044

Carlos Motta and the use of reclaimed wood

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Reclaimed wood warehouse in São Paulo, Brazil.

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Reclaimed wood warehouse in São Paulo, Brazil.

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Reclaimed wood warehouse in São Paulo, Brazil.

Rio Manso - Carlos Motta

Rio Manso line by Carlos Motta

Asturias Armchair - Carlos Motta - Ambience Angra

Asturias armchair by Carlos Motta

Asturias Chaise Outdoors - Carlos Motta

Asturias chaise by Carlos Motta

Parati Table - Carlos Motta - Ambience (2)

Parati dining table by Carlos Motta

Photos: 1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7

Sustainability, ecological responsibility and conservation are crucial concerns in contemporary design, especially in wood production.

Brazilian art and design have traditionally engaged with the re-appropriation of materials and ideas as resource for its cultural production.  In this canon, an innovative dissemination of Brazil’s rich ancestry is exemplified in the utilization of reclaimed Brazilian woods in the practice of some of Brazil’s leading architects and designers.

The work of Carlos Motta, such as his Asturias, Rio Manso and Parati lines, utilizes stocks of reclaimed native Brazilian wood that sometimes date back as far as to the 1800’s; carrying traces of colonial farms and industrial constructions into the clean lines, relaxed and comfortable high-end attitude of Motta’s designs.  In addition to their distinct appearance, the pieces made from reclaimed wood transcend the function of their designs to include a little of Brazil’s history and regional diversity.